Happy New Year

McDonald Land Rover Series Facebook Tab

Hue 166 and cry; Click the image to go to JLR’s Facebook video The Land Rover Story

Picture courtesy of Jaguar Land Rover Media Centre

Happy new year to all loyal listeners, we’ve been busy supplying the wonderful Land Rover owners all the parts their hearts requested.

Not only have we seen a strong demand for Land Rover parts and accessories at McDonald Land Rover, Jaguar Land Rover have seen a record year of sales.

Boosted by the stunning F Type and supported by the Lottery Dreamers’ favourite, the Range Rover Sport, a near-20% increase on the previous year’s figures saw the company wave ta-ta (hur hur) to  425,000 happy customers.

And it’s reasonable to assume that they are happy customers, as Jaguar topped the 2013 JD Power customer survey for the second year in a row.

Judged to be the best performing brand when taking into account dealer servicing and parts prices as well as the ‘owner’ experience, a Jag should be a car you want to get India garage (india garage, get it?)

In terms of individual car performance, the Jaguar XF came third, a mere 0.3% off the winner’s satisfaction score. 82.7% of XF owners placed their car above all others.

On the Four By Four front, Land Rover came 6th overall, the first time it’s entered the top ten of the JD Power Survey and a sign of things to come.

Seeing Land Rover tying in 5th place with  arch off-road rivals Toyota is a real indicator of how much the brand values customers, placing not only their comfort but also the technicians’ performance at the top of their priorities.

The highest Land Rover was the Freelander 2 a join 39th. The Discovery 4 tied at 61, beating amongst other notable adversaries the Audi RS6, Q5, Q7, BMW X3, Volvo XC90.

Hot competition smited, the Chelsea Tractor brand of choice did well considering the compromise necessary when looking at just the vehicle alone. Though you’d love the bling-mobiles on your driveway, the fuel and insurance costs would worry Rupert Murdoch, so perhaps the Skoda Yeti is safe for now.

Watch What Car’s video op-ed on the results here

What Car’s JD Power Survey Video

To see Jaguar Land Rover’s Facebook video The Land Rover Story, click the image above.

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Series Business

McDonald Land Rover Trophy winners newly-weds Chris and Sarah Mumby who were taken to the wedding ceremony in St Asaph in a rare 1949 Series 1 Land Rover

We are very proud to show this wonderful restoration project, a 1949 Series 1 restoration by Wyn Jones, co-owner of Jones Bros of Rhuallt.

A RARE Series 1 Land Rover, restored for use as a wedding car, won a new trophy at last week’s Denbigh & Flint Show.

Wyn Jones had been intending to refit the 1949 vehicle for  more than a decade when daughter Sarah declared she wanted it for her wedding at St Winefride Church, St Asaph.

Originally owned by Capt Frost, Llanbedr DC, Wyn bought it from Ruthin builder Roland Turner 25 years ago, intending to do it up.

Son Jonathan made a start at the Jones Bros workshops, Rhuallt, owned by his dad and uncle Mervyn.

But the job was left unfinished after Jonathan’s death 11 years ago.

“Last year Sarah said she wanted it for her wedding, so I had to do it,” said Wyn.

“These days it’s hard to get hold of the parts but I’d bought most of them 20 years ago so it was fairly straightforward.

“Even so, I finished at 5.30pm on the Friday evening and the wedding was on the Saturday.”

The resprayed vehicle, with original log-book, was among 21 Land Rovers that paraded at last week’s Denbigh & Flint to mark the brand’s 65th anniversary.

Courtesy of The Daily Post

www.mcdonaldlandrover.co.uk  or see me on Google+

This article was written by Rupert Astbury

Going Bush

Having just seen this African tour company, we are reminded of how versatile and far-reaching is the Land Rover:

Bush Ways Safari

Bush Ways Safari Landrover

Bush Ways Safari Land Rover

All our vehicles are tough reliable Safari Land Rovers

B: All our customised safari vehicles are extra wide allowing for more seating space and have:
1 Folding windscreen,
2 Removable canvas roof,
3 Perspex windows for the cold and rain,
4 Fridge for cold beverages,
5 Folding side door,
6 Comfortable coil spring suspension,
7 120L water tank with tap
8 Open sides for unobstructed views.

Our trailers are also custom-built on Land Rover chassis:
9 Chair box for easy access,
10 Easy modular packing system – saves time,
11 Folding side table complete with full kitchen behind.

In the words of the Beach Boys, wouldn’t it be nice.

www.mcdonaldlandrover.co.uk or see me on Google+

This article was written by Rupert Astbury

What’s A Land Rover Then?

Land Rover, the Go Anywhere Vehicle

Land Rover The Go Anywhere Vehicle

The Landrover Series I – II – III Defined Its Iconic Place in Automobile History

Starting in 1948 when its design was penned by Maurice Wilks on the Welsh island of Anglesey, the Land Rover came to establish a firm hold on the British consciousness. As an icon, it is hard to beat. It is recognisable as a symbol of British car manufacturing around the world, and with its service as the workhorse of the Commonwealth’s Armed Forces it has seen action everywhere from snow-blasted escarpments to searing desert ranges.

The first model of Landrover is known by its utilitarian name, Series I or Series One. Two more major revisions (and one interim) were to come, and a tradition was established when they were called the Series II, Series IIA and Series III. Split mainly between the 88 inch SWB (short wheelbase) and 109 inch LWB (long wheelbase) there were also special vehicles made for Emergency Services and the Armed Forces, including the Army’s own 101 Forward Control development of the Series II.

At the end of November 2012, there were still almost thirty thousand 88 and 109 models in the DVLA’s system.

In 1990 the new Defender took on the mantle, and we had seen the last of the Series. The King is dead, long live the King!.

A Short History

After the Second World War, the British Army was on a lookout for a suitable replacement for its personal carrier vehicles that until then had been happily met by the Ford Willys Jeep that the US Army left after the war.

Maurice Wilks, head designer at the Rover Company based in Birmingham was said to have been inspired by the same Jeep and his Landrover prototype was actually built on its chassis. The first production grade Landrover made of aluminium was exhibited at the Amsterdam Motor Show of 1948. It took the colour from paint the British Army had immense surplus of – green. Hence, the first Landrover came in various shades of it and thanks to its non-corrosive all-aluminium body, the Series I Landrover, which lasted for 10 years before getting a model update in the Series II, built a reputation for durability under the toughest road conditions.

Over their 42 year reign as the first SUVs on the planet, the Series Landrovers have found their way onto the roll-call of many armies around the world. First used by the Brits using the simpler 2.25 litre Petrol engine, the Series saw action in the Korean War of the early 1950s as well as the Suez Crisis. The 1960s saw various versions on the same Series chassis that made into a multi-role personnel carrier, a long range desert patrol known in military circles as the “Pink Panther” and machine gun equipped versions.

Its versatility echoed much of the civilian after-market conversion kits that allowed the Series Landrovers to be an ambulance, an amphibious rescue craft, a pick-up truck, a closed delivery van, a farm hauler, a police patrol and a family car. Its hand-built construction made it the easier vehicle to overhaul and modify.

In 1976, the one millionth Series rolled off its factory at Solihull. By this time, the Rover Group had released a more upscale Range Rover model with the luxury appointments that predated the release of the Cherokee Jeep which is mistakenly credited with having created the SUV trend. The Army’s Series Landrovers would have seen action in the Falklands War of 1982 if not for the sinking of the “Atlantic Conveyor” – a merchant vessel requisitioned to transport Military equipment including Chinook Helicopters and several hundred Landrovers to the Falklands. The loss nearly wiped out the British Army’s land rover fleet. It was soon replaced by 200 Series III Landrovers.

Change of Hands

Landrover changed hands twice in the UK. First to government-owned Leyland Motors (later British Leyland) who acquired the Rover Company in 1967. The Ryder report of 1975 recommended separating the marque and it was included in the transfer of the now privatised Rover Group to British Aerospace.

The marque fell into German hands when BMW bought the Rover Group in 1994 to facilitate its move into fashion-orientated ‘soft-roaders’. The now profitable Landrover and Jaguar brands were then passed on to Ford, and eventually sold again to India’s Tata Motors.

Articles And Links

The official Land Rover History Page

Jalopnik’s Blog

Winwaed’s Series Website

Click here to buy Land Rover Series Parts and Accessories from our webshop

www.mcdonaldlandrover.co.uk or see me on Google+

This article was written by Rupert Astbury